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The Perpetual Refugee - Images of a Holocaust Child

225 x 150 mm, 144 pages, 12 photos

ISBN 9780648043980, $19.95, Paperback

Paul Kraus

Available: 1 May 2018

This is a story of a foreign child’s images of life. In a tiny way it is the template for all foreign children who come to a new country and have to readjust their identity, especially their language.

These are the images of a child who was born into the worst case of genocide in the history of the Western world. Six million Jews and one and a half million Jewish children lost their lives across Europe. Somehow the author’s family survived. These images have survival as one of its main themes.

The wonderful words of Anne Frank at the very beginning of this book set the stamp on these images for all Jews in every age. They also resonate with foreigners in every time and place. Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s brief quote is also highly relevant: that the battle lines between good and evil run through the heart of every man.

Survival runs through these stories in different ways, including emotional and physical recovery. Somehow the Almighty wanted the author to survive in different ways throughout his life, even in the face of a terminal illness. Shadows have cast their stamp on his life, even when those who tried to destroy him at the beginning, saved him from cancer. The experience of life-saving medical treatment by the Germans was an incredible piece of reconciliation and love.

Finally, this book reaffirms that we are all body, mind and spirit in this technologically miraculous age. Our computerised, digital world tries to expel the fact that we are spiritual beings, whatever religious label we wear.